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I am profoundly BAGA! By Carlos Sanvee


cc NP
Where are the marches in Africa for the Baga massacre, where 2,000 mainly women, children and the elderly were killed by Boko Haram? Where are the public condemnations and editorials of outrage for Baga?

I am Baga. I am an African. And it concerns me – all of this madness and mayhem. I am Charlie second to being Baga. Yet the eyes of the world are so focused on the Charlie Hebdo terrorism that the increasing insidious acts of terror in our backyard are being overlooked by even the African citizens and African media. Don’t get me wrong, a life lost, Baga or Charlie is a needless loss to me and the world, but ponder these facts with me…

Boko Haram is steadily increasing its grip in West Africa and particularly in Nigeria. Their acts of terror, violence and bloodshed are seemingly becoming so commonplace they are being overlooked and sidelined in the face of other news. The Baga incident shows an escalation by Boko Haram: the body count is said to be as high as 2,000. Baga town was razed, with most victims being children, women and the elderly who could not run fast enough to avoid the rocket-propelled grenades and assault rifle fire. Tell me how a death toll of 2,000 equating more or less to 133 Charlie Hebdo attacks is ignored by the world?

How about the young tender girl at the market place of Maiduguri, where at least 20 people were killed when explosives attached to her detonated? Although not clear, Boko Haram is thought to be responsible.

And yet we watched our African statesmen marching and mourning amongst the approximately 1.6 million in Paris who turned out in solidarity for the Charlie Hebdo attack. Where are the marches in Africa for the Baga massacre? Where are even the public condemnations and editorials of outrage for Baga?

The Africa Alliance of YMCAs takes a firm stand on the Boko Haram reign of terror and the recent Baga incidents: we shout out that it needs to be stopped. We need as African countries to stand together and act against the terror attacks raging in the West of our continent.

Along with Al Shabaab and the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL or ISIS), all virulent threats to world peace, Boko Haram has a strong youth focus. It is the common youth in our society that you and I might know; the 15-20-year-old boy or girl next door; the one we may chose to ignore as a common nuisance who is easy prey to these terror groups! We even easily dismiss some as young people from dysfunctional families, depressed youth, unemployed and without income. Yet they experience widespread and deep disengagement from the social, economic and political systems and an associated growing sense of radical disaffection. Yes! This group of youth is angry; feels alienated and disenfranchised from society. They are not interested in merely talking about their problems and lot in life; they are desperate and burning for an opportunity to take action and change their lives; they believe joining a movement offers economic, social and psychological rewards, an adventure, camaraderie and a heightened sense of identity. These are youth who easily fall prey to recruiters who are mostly their friends, people they trust, and people who offer them what they are missing in life!

We must arise and offer our younger generation alternatives and choices to develop their identity, and feel engaged without resorting to violence and terror. We at the Africa Alliance of YMCAs are working on solutions that transform youth from subjects to citizens to effect positive change in their environment; giving them Voice, Space and Ability to Influence positively. We call on governments, civil society and private sector to step up youth empowerment initiatives to offer healthy and positive solutions to a generation of young people hungry for acceptance, engagement and change.

We call on our African governments to provide more decisive leadership in the fight against terror in our continent. Let us show we value the lives of our citizens more, lest we continue to be eclipsed by world events where few lives lost are seemingly more important than thousands in our lands.

Let us join together and show that we are willing to rise up, value ourselves and take care of our young people. How can we expect those outside of Africa to value us if we don’t? We must stop Boko Haram – for the sake of our own lives and the legacy we leave for the younger generation and the world.

So yes I am Charlie, provided it is not just for the French cartoonists, but for all those who are denied the right to express themselves or to simply exist. I am Charlie yes, but I am profoundly Baga!

* Carlos Sanvee is General Secretary of African Alliance of YMCAs.

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2015 in Governanace, Human Rights

 

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Je suis Baga! by Ian Taylor


 
Why is Abuja not ‘the capital of the world’ today? Why is it that African leaders will fly to Paris to express camaraderie and unity after seventeen Europeans are murdered, but are entirely absent if and when 2,000 Africans are butchered?

Yesterday, on January 11, 2015, the world witnessed an unprecedented demonstration of solidarity in Paris. In an extraordinary coming together, between 1.2 million to 1.6 million people marched to pay tribute to the recent victims of Islamist terrorism. Apparently the last time such crowds filled the streets of France’s capital was at the Liberation of Paris from the Nazis in 1944.

‘Paris is today the capital of the world,’ President Hollande asserted.

In the central Place de la République, a sea of French flags were waved, alongside signs asking ‘Pourquoi?’ (Why?). Groups spontaneously broke out into ‘La Marseillaise’. The entire event was percolated with shock and outrage at the barbaric attacks which saw seventeen people, including journalists and police, killed in three days, beginning with the now infamous massacre at the offices of the political weekly, Charlie Hebdo, a magazine renowned for its satirical attacks on all sorts of people and beliefs, including Islam.

Elsewhere, at least 3.7 million people took part in silent marches throughout France, the biggest public demonstration ever registered in the country.

In Paris, world leaders rushed to attend the march. In fact, over 40 presidents and prime ministers marched together, with arms linked, on the streets of Paris.

What was notable was that Mali’s President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita held hands with President François Hollande of France at the head of the march. For a moment, an African leader was front and centre in an event that was globally televised and where the refrain of ‘Je suis Charlie’ was heard everywhere.

This is all very interesting and reflects perhaps the signs of the times. A mass outpouring of outrage and distress at the seventeen killed is understandable in this era where terror seems to strike at any time. I am for not one second diminishing the horrific events in France and the threat posed to all civilised peoples by Islamist extremists.

Yet I cannot avoid a certain unease at this mass march in which African leaders jostled to appear and where African flags were seen being waved in in the Place de la République.

Last week, in the town of Baga in northern Nigeria, the terror group Boko Haram captured a military base. The Islamists then proceeded to drive through the town shooting and firing rocket-propelled grenades. When they departed, they left 2,000 dead in the streets, most of whom were children, women and elderly people. Countless more were injured and/or traumatised and the town was effectively destroyed.

Thus far, more than 10,000 people have been killed over the last five-years by Boko Haram, with more than a million people displaced inside Nigeria and hundreds of thousands fleeing across the borders into Chad and Cameroon.

Why is Abuja not ‘the capital of the world’ today? Why is it that African leaders will fly to Paris to express camaraderie and unity after seventeen Europeans are murdered, but are entirely absent if and when 2,000 Africans are butchered? Why has there been no similar march of solidarity by 40 world leaders in Nigeria? Let’s even drastically lower expectations: why has there been no march of solidarity by even one African leader to express sympathy and concern for Nigeria? Are African lives really so worthless?

Je suis Charlie? Oui, absolument.

Mais je suis aussi Baga !

* Ian Taylor is Professor, School of International Relations, University of St. Andrews (Scotland, UK) Chair Professor, Renmin University of China, China, Professor Extraordinary, University of Stellenbosch, South Africa and Honorary Professor, Institute of African Studies, Zhejiang Normal University, China

 
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Posted by on January 16, 2015 in Governanace, Human Rights

 

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Post Anambra Gubernatorial Election, by the Transition Monitoring Group (TMG)

…..Response to the latest developments which  warranted INEC to declare the elections inconclusive and then the prospects fore a supplementary elections in Anambra State.

TMG Pre-Election Findings

Elections are more than just Election Day, and TMG has been observing the entire process

for the Anambra Gubernatorial Election.

TMG’s main findings related to the pre-election period include:

1. The judiciary speedily resolved electoral petitions, but the spate of litigation over

Party Primaries is a worrying sign.

2. INEC’s decision to release the voter’s register to political parties in electronic

format was a very positive improvement. In the future, the voter’s register should

also be made available to civic organisations.

3. INEC should also publish the results of the election by polling unit.

4. An encouraging development was the holding of candidate debates as it served

as an opportunity to make the election more substantive and issue-based.

However, it did not appear that all 23 gubernatorial candidates engaged in

serious campaigning.

5. There were widespread allegations of the buying up of voter cards by politicians.

TMG Post-Election Findings

TMG wishes to state as regards the November 16, 2013 Anambra Governorship Polls, based

on reports from our citizen observers, which they sent in via coded text message using

mobile phones, that while many elements of the Election Day process were adequate, there

were serious shortcomings, including:

1. Late arrival of election materials at polling units – as of 7:30am, observers

reported that only 39% of polling units across the state had their election materials

and by 9am only 43% of polling units were able to open; When materials finally

arrived, at 58% of polling units observers reported two polling officials; at 38% of

polling units three or more polling officials were present; while at just 4% of polling

units there was only one polling official present.

2. The widespread late delivery of election materials delayed the start of

accreditation of voters across the state.

3. Simultaneous accreditation and voting (i.e. individuals being allowed to accredit and

vote after accreditation had closed) created the possibility of illegal voting – at 28%

of polling units 50 or more people were accredited during voting.

4. No elections in five wards of Idemili North LGA – Abatete, Nkpor I, Nkpor II,

Obosi and Ogidi I. Observers at all 14 sampled polling stations in these wards

reported no election;

5. Individuals with voter’s cards were refused accreditation – at 19% of polling units,

between 6 and 25 people with voter’s cards were denied accreditation, for whatever

reason and could not vote; Simultaneous accreditation and voting (i.e. individuals

being allowed to accredit and vote after accreditation had closed) created the

possibility of illegal voting – at 28% of polling units, 50 or more people were

accredited during voting; and

6. A significant number of voters who left polling units after accreditation did not

return to vote – at 31% of polling units, the number of accredited voters exceeded

the number of actual voters by more than 10%.

7. At 52% of polling units, observers reported four or more political party agents; at

39% of polling units, there were one to three political party agents present, while 9%

of polling units had no agents from any party present.

Methodology

TMG as a member of the Global Network of Domestic Election Monitors (GNDEM), as well

as the West African of Election Observer Network (WAEON) conducts all of its citizen

observation efforts in accordance with the “Declaration of Global Principles for Nonpartisan

Election Observation and Monitoring by Citizen Organisations.”

TMG’s innovative Quick Count observation effort is intended to help promote credible

elections in Nigeria that are conducted in accordance with international and regional

standards as well as the laws of our country by providing real time independent nonpartisan

information on the conduct of Election Day processes – setup of polling units,

accreditation of voters, voting and counting.

The Quick Count methodology involves deploying trained and accredited citizen observers

in pairs to a representative random sample of polling units carefully selected by a trained

statistician. Because reports are received from a representative sample of polling units, the

findings can be extrapolated to all polling units (even those which TMG did not deploy

observers) based on long-established statistical principles. Thus, the findings from the Quick

Count hold for all 4,608 polling units in Anambra. The Quick Count methodology is the gold

standard in citizen observation.

TMG’s Quick Count also takes advantage of the latest developments in information and

communication technologies (ICTs). TMG has established a National Information Centre

(NIC) in Abuja with a sophisticated database and text messaging system. To ensure real time

information, TMG observers submit their reports via coded text messages using their

mobile phones. Reports are received directly into a database and processed.

Deployment of Observers

TMG deployed a total of 633 observers for the Anambra Gubernatorial Election. Of these,

33 were mobile supervisors who moved around the state and 600 were stationary assigned

to specific polling units. TMG stationary observers sent in more than 3,000 text messages

with over 20,000 individual pieces of information about the conduct of the Election Day

process. Stationary observers were deployed in pairs to a representative random sample of

300 polling units across all three senatorial districts and all 21 local government areas

(LGAs). To ensure the representativeness of the sample, it was stratified by senatorial

district and LGA. This means that the proportion of sampled polling units closely matches

the proportion of all polling units in each senatorial district and in each LGA. For example

Anambra North has 30.2% percent of all polling units (1,391 of 4,608) and 30.0% percent of

the sampled polling stations are in Anambra North (180 of 300). Appendix 1 provides a

detailed breakdown of the sampled polling stations by senatorial district and LGA.

TMG conducted two rounds of training workshops for LGA supervisors as well as 29 training

workshops for observers. All observers were accredited with INEC. On the morning of

Election Day, there were isolated incidents of TMG observers not being permitted to

observe, but all of these issues were ultimately resolved.

In response to the INEC decision to extend a second day of voting in Obosi ward in Idemili

North LGA, TMG deployed 28 citizen observers on Sunday to observe the process in the

initially sampled polling units. According to reports from TMG citizen observers on Saturday,

there were similar problems of no elections taking place in Abatete, Nkpor I, Nkpor II and

Ogidi I wards, which are also in Idemili North LGA, as well two polling units in Ogbaru LGA.

TMG as the premier citizen observer network in the country comprising over 400 civic

organizations has observed all elections since the end of military rule in 1998/99.

For the Anambra Gubernatorial Election TMG employed the advanced Quick Count

methodology, the gold standard for election observation, TMG’s citizen observers were

deployed to a representative random sample of 300 polling stations located across every

senatorial district and all 21 local government areas (LGAs). Thus, TMG observers were in

every corner of the state, from the capital Awka to the most remote riverine areas. On

Sunday as we have noted earlier, TMG redeployed 28 observers for the second day of

voting in Idemili North. Throughout the day TMG’s citizen observers sent their observation

reports via coded text message using mobile phones directly into a computer database

located at a National Information Centre (NIC) in Abuja. In total, they sent in more than

3,000 text messages containing more than 20,000 individual pieces of information about

Election Day processes, as well as the official results as announced by INEC official at polling

units.

INEC Declaration on Anambra Election

While the Independent National Election Commission (INEC) should be acknowledged for

providing an opportunity for election to be conducted in Obosi Ward of Idemili North LGA

on Sunday, November 17, 2013, TMG wonders why the remaining Wards of Abatete, Nkpor

1, Nkpor II, and Ogidi 1 Wards, as well as two polling units in Ogbaru LGA which have similar

problems of no election were not taken into consideration. We must note that these

shortcomings undermine public confidence in the electoral process – especially since many

of these issues are not new and have plagued past elections.

Conclusion

TMG salutes INEC’s courage to accept responsibility for failure of their official, whom they

claimed was working for outside interest; and whom they say has been handed over to the

police for investigation. We challenge INEC, the Security Agencies and the Federal

Government to expose the outside interest. But that is however not enough; INEC must be

move beyond that; the identity of the alleged collaborators and those they are working with

must be exposed. Anambrarians and indeed the Nigerian people deserve to know this.

The Anambra Gubernatorial Election is not yet over. As you are already aware, the election

has been declared inconclusive following the cancellation of the votes in some areas. That

cancellation according to INEC affected 113, 113 votes which also led to the inability of a

clear winner to emerge. For that reason a supplementary election is to be held in all the

said areas. As a result, TMG will continue to observe the unfolding process as INEC makes

public the arrangement for the supplementary elections. TMG calls on all the people of

Anambra State to remain calm as they await INEC’s announcement of results. TMG will

continue to observe the process, and as appropriate issue additional statements and

reports. As part of the Quick Count, TMG will provide independent verification of the official

results as announced by INEC to enhance the transparency and accountability of the

process.

TMG insists that for the 2015 elections to be credible INEC must work in partnership with

political parties, civic organizations, and government bodies to find practical solutions to

chronic problems plaguing our elections. To this end, TMG stands ready to work with INEC

and other partners to help ensure the 2015 Elections meet the expectations of the Nigerian

people”

Comrade Zikirilluhi M. Ibrahim

Chairman

For Enquiries, contact

Comrade Eneruvie Enakoko

TMG Media Centre

08033188864, 08094648891

 

 
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Posted by on November 21, 2013 in Governanace

 

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POLICE DISRUPTS STOP IMPUNITY PEACE WALK IN ABUJA

PRESS RELEASE 

Abuja, Thursday, November 21, 2013:  The Stop Impunity Nigeria (S.I.N.) Campaign notes with regret the descent into lawlessness and anarchy that has become an art of governance in recent times. We recall that the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria 1999 guarantees the right to freedom of expression, freedom of assembly, freedom of association and freedom of movement to all Nigerians. We further recall that these rights are guaranteed in a multiplicity of domestic and international instruments binding on Nigeria.

In furtherance of these rights, the S.I.N. Campaign, Citizens Wealth Platform and Say No Campaign mobilized Nigerians in Abuja for a Peace Walk against Impunity in Public Finance Management. Contrary to civilized conduct and laid down rules of engagement for law enforcement officials, hundreds of Nigerians with women in the majority who gathered at the Millennium Park in Abuja were dispersed without warning with heavy teargas. In the process of dispersing the peaceful men and women, one Madam Tule Tatiana sustained serious injuries and has been hospitalized. The Police led by a very senior officer claimed to be acting on orders from above to disperse the Peace Walk. The Police tore the banners and posters and chased participants out of the Park. Pray, where is this “above” from which illegal orders always come from.

A walk against fiscal impunity has been met with aggravated physical impunity that threatens the lives and limb of innocent citizens who have been subjected to inhuman and degrading treatment. A Police that turns its guns and arsenals on its employers is not a Police fit for a civilised nation, while an administration that fails to allow peaceful display of banners and placards cannot be described as democratic.

Nigerians demand to see the difference between the Jonathan Administration and that of the late dictator, General Sani Abacha. The other day, it was the ASUU demonstration and the Dino Melaye workshop that were dispersed and today, S.I.N. tastes its share of the impunity dose being prescribed by the Jonathan Administration.

S.I.N. therefore demands an unequivocal public apology, compensation and guarantees of non repetition. This is the minimum that reasonable men and women expect.

For further information, please contact:

Ayode Longe

Programme Manager

Media Rights Agenda

Email: info@stopimpunitynigeria.org

 

 

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TMG Verifies INEC Official Results (So Far) for Anambra Elections As Accurate

Based on Quick Count method, the Transition Monitoring Group, TMG, has described as accurate the released results by INEC of the Anambra State Gubernatorial Elections. Recall the results are not complete owing to incomplete polls that has been rescheduled. Below the complete text of the Press Conference held on November 19th, 2013…..

Distinguished guests, our respected partners, stakeholders, ladies and gentlemen of the media, on behalf of the Transition Monitoring Group (TMG) Quick Count Working Group I am delighted to welcome you to this press conference on our preliminary observation findings for the Anambra Gubernatorial Election held on Saturday November 16th, 2013.

The Independent National Election Commission (INEC) has now publicly announced official results for 4,400 of 4,608 of polling stations for the Anambra Gubernatorial Election. While a date has not yet been publicised, INEC has announced that supplemental voting for 208 polling units of which 160 are in Idemili North local government area (LGA).

Based on the Quick Count methodology, TMG can confidently verify that the collation process was done properly and the official results as announced by INEC on November 18th, 2013 accurately reflect the votes cast on Election Day at those polling stations which held elections.

The official INEC results for each candidate closely match TMG’s independent estimates – which are based on polling unit results collected from a representative random sample of polling units across all three senatorial districts and all 21 LGAs.

Only INEC declares official results as INEC is the constitutionally mandated body to conduct all aspects of elections. TMG does not announce official results. It provides independent verification of the official results as announced by INEC to enhance transparency and accountability in the electoral process.

As TMG has reported before, the process was not without serious shortcomings, including:

1. Late arrival of election materials to polling units;

2. No elections in five wards of Idemili North LGA – this issue is particularly worrisome as Idemili North is a party stronghold;

3. Individuals with voter’s cards were refused accreditation; Pa ge 2 4. Simultaneous accreditation and voting (i.e. individuals being allowed to accredit and vote after accreditation had closed) created the possibility of illegal voting; and

4. Simultaneous accreditation and voting (i.e. individuals being allowed to accredit and vote after accreditation had closed) created the possibility of illegal voting; and

5. A significant number of voters who left polling units after accreditation did not return to vote (thereby disenfranchising themselves).

These shortcomings undermine public confidence in the electoral process – especially since many of these issues are not new and have plagued past elections. For the 2015 elections to be credible, INEC must work in partnership with political parties, civic organizations, and government bodies to find practical solutions to these problems.

Methodology

TMG is a member of the Global Network of Domestic Election Monitors (GNDEM) as well as the West African Election Observer Network (WAEON) and conducts all of its citizen observation efforts in accordance with the “Declaration of Global Principles for Nonpartisan Election Observation and Monitoring by Citizen Organisations”.

TMG’s innovative Quick Count observation effort is intended tohelp promote credible elections in Nigeria which are conducted in accordance with international and regional standards as well as the laws of our country by providing real time independent non-partisan information on the conduct of Election Day processes – setup of polling units, accreditation of voters, voting and count.

The Quick Count methodology involves deploying trained and accredited citizen observers in pairs to a representative random sample of polling units carefully selected by a trained statistician. Because reports are received from a representative sample of polling units, the findings can be extrapolated to all polling units (even thosewhich TMG did not deploy observers) based on long established statistical principles. Thus, the findings from the Quick Count hold for all 4,608 polling units in Anambra. The Quick Count methodology is the gold standard in citizen observation.

TMG’s Quick Count also takes advantage of the latest developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs). TMG has established a National Information Centre (NIC) in Abuja with a sophisticated database and text messaging system. To ensure real time information, TMG observers submit their reports via coded text messages using their mobile phones. Reports are received directly into a database and processed.

Deployment of Observers

TMG deployed a total of 633 observers for the Anambra Gubernatorial Election. Of these 33 were mobile supervisors who moved around the state and 600 were stationary assigned to a specific polling units. TMG stationary observers sent in more than 3,000 text messages with over 20,000 individual pieces of information about the conduct of the Election Day process.

Stationary observers were deployed in pairs to a representative random sample of 300 polling units across all three senatorial districts and all 21 local government areas Pa ge 3

(LGAs).To ensure the representativeness of the sample it was stratified by senatorial district and LGA. This means that the proportion of sampled polling units closely matches the proportion of all polling units in each senatorial district and in each LGA. For example Anambra North has 30.2% percent of all polling units (1,391 of 4,608) and 30.0% percent of the sampled polling stations are in Anambra North (180 of 300). Appendix I and II provide a detailed breakdown of the sampled polling stations by senatorial district and LGA.

Verification of Official INEC Results

The Quick Count methodology allows for the independent verification of the official results as announced by INEC. Since citizen observers are deployed to a representative random sample across all three senatorial districts and 21 LGAs, the official results can be collected from those sampled polling units and added together to estimate the official INEC result. If the official result as announced by INEC falls within the margin of error of the Quick Count estimate it means that the official result announced by INEC accurately reflects the ballot cast at polling units. Table 1: Comparison of Official INEC Results from November 18th, 2013 with TMG Quick Count Estimates for Anambra Gubernatorial Election 2013
Political Party Quick Count Estimate Margin of Error Quick Count Estimate Range Official INEC Result Official INEC Result within Quick Count Estimate Range
APC 23.8% 2.4% 21.4% – 26.2% 21.5% Yes
APGA 40.8% 2.8% 37.0% – 43.6% 40.7% Yes
LP 7.9% 2.5% 5.4% – 10.4% 8.7% Yes
PDP 21.4% 2.2% 19.2% – 23.6% 22.1% Yes
Other 19 Parties 2.9% 0.5% 2.4% – 3.4% 3.2% Yes
Rejected Ballots 3.1% 0.5% 2.6% – 3.6% 3.9% No

 

 

 

 
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Posted by on November 20, 2013 in Governanace, Uncategorized

 

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Interim Statement on the 2013 Anambra State Governorship Election

The governorship election in Anambra State has progressed without any major hitch, and the people of Anambra state have so far conducted themselves in a peaceful manner. Reports received by the Nigeria Civil Society Election Situation Room from our network of observers throughout Anambra State indicate that security agents were deployed in sufficient numbers in most polling units, and that these officers and men have in the main conducted themselves in a professional and commendable manner. This is in spite of reports that security officers deployed from outside Anambra State were not adequately provided with food and shelter.

However, the Nigerian Civil Society Election Situation Room received reports that accreditation process did not commence on time in many polling units, particularly in Idemili North, Idemili South, and Ogbaru Local Government Areas, due to the perennial challenge of late arrival of election officials and materials. INEC has in response extended the accreditation and voting periods for the affected areas, but more needs to be done to protect the integrity of the election process.

The Situation Room was also informed by observers that election officials were not deployed in sufficient numbers to some polling units, making it difficult for the election officials posted to the units to effectively carry out their duties. We received reports that in a particular polling unit, election officials were recruited at the election venue and deployed without any form of training. We fear that this could pose challenges during the voting and collation processes.

Although there were no reports of large-scale disenfranchisement of voters following the omission of their names in the voters register, our network of observers noted that some voters could not find their names in their voters’ register in a number of polling units. In some communities, the polling units were located far apart, making it difficult for some voters to reach their polling units. These challenges, in addition to the generally low voter turnout reported by observers, call for a concerted effort by INEC to ensure that registered voters are not disenfranchised and that voter apathy is addressed in future elections.

As the Anambra State governorship election progresses, we expect that INEC will carry out the process in a professional and transparent manner, and that the voters, party agents and security forces will continue to conduct themselves in peaceful manner.

The Nigerian Civil Society Election Situation Room will issue a final statement on the Anambra State governorship election subsequently.

Nigeria Civil Society Election Situation Room
2  Okemesi Crescent, Off Oro-ago Crescent,
Garki II,
Abuja, Nigeria.
Tel: +234(0)809 189 9999
Email: electionsituationroom@placng.org
Website: http://electionsituationroom.wordpress.com

 

 
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Posted by on November 17, 2013 in Governanace, Human Rights, Uncategorized

 

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